David Bowie Days

I’m a bit of an archivist. If I like something or someone, I really want to lay hands on all that I can get (you saw reference to this in my Ute Lemper post in fact). And David Bowie is one of those artists I just love: I proudly have all of his studio albums.

Every now and again I’ll decide to really dig in and focus on one musician, composer, or group. And when it’s one where I have a complete collection, it’s very nice to listen to their complete oeuvre and hear how the artist grows and develops over time.

So yesterday and today have been David Bowie Days for me, especially focusing on the albums I don’t know nearly so well, like Station To Station and The Man Who Sold The World.

The nice thing about the Internet for me at times like this is I can dig in more broadly and find out more about the music and his background over at Wikipedia (which may even be accurate!).

And after some looking about, I find there’s a YouTube David Bowie channel now. Unfortunately, it doesn’t have much on there right now, but hopefully they’ll add more.

While this isn’t posted on the David Bowie channel, someone else has also posted the great video for “Wild is the Wind” off of Station To Station.

Of course, going through David Bowie’s works end to end also underscores how versatile an artist he is. More than nearly anyone else, he is is able to learn different music forms, understand them, master them and adapt them to make them his own. The difference between Low and, say, Hunky Dory is more like the difference between different artists than the difference of six years with the same artist.

It’s no wonder that an old girlfriend in High School who was a violinist and generally didn’t like Pop/Rock counted him as one of her favorites (at least back then). I’ve said for years that his ability to master forms makes him the closest thing to a Mozart in the Pop/Rock genre.